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91-year-old Victim Support volunteer awarded BEM in New Year Honours

10 January 2017

Photograph of Peter Cave

Peter Cave, Stoke Sentinel, 10 January 2017.

Peter Cave has been awarded a British Empire Medal (BEM) in the Queen’s New Year Honours for decades of community service to people affected by crime in Staffordshire.

91-year-old Peter began volunteering with Victim Support in 1994.

Speaking to the Stoke Sentinel, Peter said:

‘When one does volunteering for many years, you never think or expect that there will be any recognition. Then, out of the blue, I got this award.

‘I think everyone who gets one will feel the same way — surprised — but it’s a very nice surprise.’

Before joining Victim Support, Peter had a distinguished career which included active service during World War II, as a Special Police Officer in East Africa in the 1950s, and working as a meteorologist in Iran, Abu Dhabi, Bahrain and Saudi Arabia, including weather reporting in Dubai in the early 1990s.

As a Victim Support volunteer, Peter supported people affected by crime in Stoke and was a founding volunteer at the Stoke-on-Trent Crown Court Witness Service from 1995. He was also Chair of Victim Support Staffordshire from 2005 to 2008.

‘I decided I should do something with my time, so I went to the volunteer advice bureau to find out if they had anything suitable.

‘I was put with Meals on Wheels, which delivered hot food to people who struggle to shop, and a training course going for the Victim Support charity.

‘I did the course, and I haven’t looked back since then.

‘I enjoyed working with Victim Support. It was very fulfilling work, and I got out what I put in. It’s an excellent organisation.’

Victim Support’s Head of Business Support Martyn Herward helped to write the nomination. He said:

‘Peter has served in different roles for Victim Support — not only delivering services but also supporting the management and development of the organisation.

‘As an individual he shows great warmth, kindness and empathy and he has continued throughout retirement to build his own skill set to provide effective support.

‘He has both empowered victims to move on from their experience and has helped justice be done at court.

‘His contribution is hugely valued by all who had the chance to work with him.’

Victim Support volunteers play a wide range of roles to help us support people affected by crime. If you would like to volunteer for Victim Support in your local community, find out how to apply.

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